Project Description

SLUM SOCIABLE

@ THE FOUNDRY

(Live Review)

14/12/2017

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Melbourne two piece, Slum Sociable, have been making waves since the release of their long-awaited self-titled debut album. Their bass-driven ambient tracks have caught the attention of audiences across the nation, and with a hugely successful response, the band have taken their latest record on tour.

Despite playing to a modest crowd, self-producing rapper Crooked Letter has no problems filling the stage. Articulating lyrics on top of beautifully produced tracks, the one-man show performs like a complete natural. Working through tracks that are vocal heavy, beat-driven, or a carefully blended mix of both, Crooked Letter presents a strong body of work. The set is an impressively intense forty minutes, and perfectly opens the night.

Next on the bill is Perth artist Teischa, who is a chance for the audience to catch their breath before the headlining act. It takes seconds for her to announce her presence, her full-bodied vocals filling the room instantly, drawing the crowd in from the walls. The set perfectly balances the energy from Crooked Letter: it’s a step down in pace but that doesn’t mean that Teishca is any less captivating. Recent release Midnight Hour is a clear standout, honing in on both vocals as well as production to create the perfect exposé of Teishca’s dynamic range of talents.

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It’s with an air of bashful casualness that Slum Sociable wander on stage. There are still a few technical difficulties to sort through, but that doesn’t make the crowd any less excited to see the band in the flesh. Having seen their acoustic set earlier in the day, I’m curious as to how the duo performs with the added bass, drums, and keys. First track Moby Bryant gives the full band a chance to show off nearly every asset: from delicate keys to horns and percussion peeking through cooing vocals, it sets a high benchmark for the rest of the set.

The setlist comes primarily from the band’s latest album, and though there are singles, each song is as well received as the next. It’s obvious that the crowd are no strangers to the content, extending to the band’s previously released EP, TQ. It’s no surprise seeing how easy Slum Sociable is to consume—their laid-back beats, stunning vocals, and funky basslines make for an infectious vibe that is interrupted only by cheers for each new song.

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As we venture deeper into the night, the band pull out older track Don’t Come Back Another 100 Times, which is a chance to truly appreciate lead Miller Upchurch’s beautiful lyrics. The slow-paced and stripped back performance feels like it’s drowning you in honey—it’s thick and heavy, but it’s also endearingly sweet. There are points where Upchurch ever so slightly misses the mark in his vocals, but it’s in these tiny imperfections that you find yourself even more drawn to the humanness of both the song as well as the people performing it.

A small break notes the near-end of the hour-long set. There is a discernible sense if insatiability in the crowd with chants of “one more song” and drawn out coos for an encore starting before the band is off stage. They return with a cover of Toploader’s Dancing In The Moonlight, a light-hearted and warmly welcomed addition to the setlist. Name Call and All Night end the show for the final time. The house lights brighten, but it takes a few moments before the crowd can uproot their feet. There is a stunned silence that voices the universal feeling of amazement felt from across the room, and It’s a few seconds before someone quietly speaks the words we’ve all been thinking: “Damn, that was good”.

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Connect with SLUM SOCIABLE!

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Reviewer Details

  • Alexandra Ainsworth

AMNPLIFY – NS