Project Description

YEO

“Desire Path” 

(Album Review)

.

Yeo

.

Melbourne multi-instrumentalist and producer, Yeo, is back with another album. The electro-pop artist released his debut, Ganbaru, back in 2015 and now with Desire Path he’s developed his sound further. With this latest project he delivers so much variety and it’s stacked with features, it’s an album that feels like a massive breath of fresh air when it comes to the electronic scene.

.

.

Yeo’s song writing hits a lot of the right marks, each song focusing on it’s own subject. It’s smart for the most part, getting both funny, emotional and sincere, covering topics of loss, relationships and social media. Three Dots is named after the three dots that appear when someone is typing a message back, it’s a witty but also relatable and relevant to the way relationships develop in a technological age. It’s brilliantly ironic how Yeo sings openly about the things everyone keeps private when it comes to social media. @snackswithyeo deals with Yeo’s “dumb feelings” about social media and also the relationship he has with his audience through social media. Though the track becomes very repetitive, possibly for a reason, as the incessant lyrics can cause the song to fade into the background a little. The song Leavinis a beautiful track that speaks about the loss of a close friend, and executed greatly, getting the feeling that Yeo said what he needed to on this record with both heart and thought. My favourite writing works on Desire Path are when Yeo shares his experiences with relationships, with tracks like Amy, Be Your Frand and He Ain’t I. Amy, is smart with it’s “Day” structure, telling his audience what he’s doing to keep “Amy” off his mind, perfectly contrasts with the reasons why he can’t. He Ain’t I about falling for a good friend’s girl, but not doing anything about it because it’s not worth the repercussions, has a memorable few lines: “What’s a boy to do but put it in a track, Change all the names and I’ll keep all the facts”. You get a sense that Yeo, not just on this track, is also using his writing for coping. I found the funniest track was Be Your Frand, an ode to the friend zone as Yeo hilariously and wholeheartedly accepts the fact that he’s only seen as a mate. The writing has stepped up more with Desire Path, exposing sides of Yeo we’ve never really seen yet.

.

Yeo

.

Tracks that are purely Yeo are great for the most part, though they’re are a lot more down tempo this time. Amy is probably the most well known sound we’re used to, instantly hooking you with it’s synth and drum beat, and these lovely little guitar bits that just add that little bit more to the song. Be Your Frand incorporates an interesting but very successful combination of instruments. With some sparkly synths, smooth bass, a drum pattern that has some trap flavours thrown into the hi-hats and to top it all off we’ve got some cowbell in there, in the hands of Yeo, brilliance. Leavin’ and He Ain’t I both had a great melodic feel to them, He Ain’t I with it’s minimalist feel, with layers of Yeo’s voice giving nice harmony, and Leavin’ has it’s smooth piano and had a wild use of drums at times but simply worked overall with the album. @snackswithyeo I found to be the least appealing song, it had it’s attention grabbing nursery-rhyme bass pattern, but the track felt too sparse and empty, and can’t help but wonder it if would’ve worked better as possibly an interlude. But Yeo’s performance is unwaveringly strong, it’s both unique and adaptable to various sounds, being able to hit the notes it needs to.

What became apparent, with tracks that had a feature, was that Yeo has a great skill of adapting his own sound to match well with the artists he’s working with. Though I did find this skill was under-utilised for Chasing Shadows, while Fractures’ writing and performance you can’t fault, especially when he hits the high notes, the song needed more of Yeo’s sounds incorporated. It felt very much like a Fractures song. Never Wanted That feels like it took a lot of influence from Drake’s Too Good (feat. Rhianna), but becomes it’s own beautiful track with it’s silky guitar and really upbeat drums. The chemistry with Asta is impeccable, the voices intertwining together on the chorus gives harmony and melody, but they simply they just sound gorgeous. The same vibes are shown on Plug Me In with Oliver White, while Yeo is more in the forefront, the sweet and also twangy, sonic sounding synths underneath them plays in tandem to give overall pleasant feel to the vocals. Wannabe is an easy going dance track, with it’s steady drum and guitar and almost jazzy piano that accompanies underneath. And Three Dots’ has it’s clanking and crashing drums with trap hi-hats and wavy synths, making for such a sticky song that flows so well. Vocals from Take Your Time and Kira Puru, respectively, just add that layer which elevates their tracks massively.

.

Yeo

.

This album from Yeo is one that definitely needs to be checked out by fans of electro-pop and it’s surrounding genres. Yeo moved forward with his sound and his style that may of missed a few marks but hit them 95% of the time. We got to know more about him on this, understand experiences and thoughts, feeling more relatable as well. Yeo is easily one of Australia’s most interesting acts and he knows how to deliver quality music.

.

.

Connect with Yeo!

[/two_third]

Reviewer Details

  • Blake Luxford